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Gov. Malloy promises more education funds – and bonus for new Alliance Districts

February 19, 2012 Areawide, Business, Local News No Comments

According to a statement made by Gov. Malloy on Feb. 8, 2012 a total of 130 towns will receive more ECS funding than they did in 2011-2012 and no town will see funding drop from 2011-2012 levels.

New, however, is the plan to make additional dollars available to something he calls Alliance Districts.

Alliance Districts will be groupings of the state’s 30 lowest-performing school districts.

Nearly $40 million will go to Alliance Districts – if they implement Gov. Malloy’s education reform strategies.

According to Gov. Malloy, an additional $4.5 million in competitive funding will be offered to all districts, with preference given to 30 Alliance districts, to fuel “ambitious innovations and deeper reforms.”

Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor commented, “The governor’s proposal acknowledges that resource constraints are one obstacle to many of our low-performing districts’ ability to improve their schools – while recognizing that increased funding alone will not improve student achievement…

“Rather, it is essential that these districts also embrace reforms rooted in best practices. The conditional funding model provides added resources and increased accountability. We look forward to working in alliance with these low-performing districts as they implement their reforms and elevate their achievement levels.”

Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman added, “I strongly believe that every child in our state deserves the opportunity to get a quality education, regardless of where they live. That is why one of our first priorities after taking office was to fully fund the ECS for all towns, and that is why we are making this targeted investment – to give that equal chance to children who happen to attend an under-performing school.”

Alliance Districts

Gov. Malloy’s proposal identifies the state’s 30 lowest-performing school districts as participants in a Performance Alliance between these districts and the State, which makes them eligible for significant increases in state funding.

To qualify for these funds, Each Alliance District must submit a reform plan that includes elements of “reform strategies” in the governor’s proposal.

The State Department of Education will review these plans and recommend which ones should be approved.

Alliance Districts can choose from these “reform strategies”:

  • “tiered district interventions” for schools based on school-level student performance;
  • additional learning time, including extended school day and year;
  • career ladders for school personnel;
  • a professional development system “informed by educator evaluations”;
  • plans to ensure K-3 reading mastery;
  • coordination of early childhood education services;
  • creating a community schools approach by establishing “wraparound services” for students with links to health and social service providers;
  • and other strategies as determined by the Education Commissioner.

Alliance Districts will have new funding phased in at the rate of 2.47 percent of the gap between what they currently receive in ECS funding and the new formula amount – other districts will receive 1.4 percent of the funding amount gap – according to Gov. Malloy’s statement.

Posted Feb. 19, 2012

Related link: More details about Gov. Malloy’s plans for Education Reform http://www.governor.ct.gov/malloy/cwp/view.asp?A=4010&Q=498746

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In Willington – Towns consider sharing cost of construction equipment

Selected proposals will receive a state grant of 50 percent, if at least one of the towns is a “distressed municipality/targeted investment community/public investment community.” Windham falls under the “distressed municipality” description and Elsesser said he is looking forward to working with Windham.

The nine towns in the Windham Region Council of Governments (WINCOG) have begun talks on a new project that could help save the towns money by sharing public works equipment.

A meeting Tuesday (Jan. 31) brought many of the public works directors and town management staffs together to brainstorm ideas.

WINCOG provides towns with a forum for intermunicipal discussion, coordination and decision­making and includes workshops on timely issues and occasions for such discussion and coordination.

Member towns are Chaplin, Columbia, Coventry, Hampton, Lebanon, Mansfield, Scotland, Willington and Windham.

The project could have the towns take advantage of the state Office of Policy and Management’s Intertown Capital Equipment Purchasing Incentive (ICE) Program.

Coventry Town Manager John Elsesser said a lot of equipment the towns were thinking of getting is “quite expensive.”

He said some of the equipment discussed Tuesday included a portable pothole patcher, a skid-steer loader, or Bobcat with special attachments, and portable lighting, among other items.

“A lot of ideas were thrown out and haven’t been finalized yet and some ideas may be added or dropped,” Elsesser said.

WINCOG Executive Director Mark Paquette said the grant offers towns a way to get the machines they need without carrying the full burden of the cost.

“Many of these towns would never be able to get these types of equipment on their own,” Paquette said. “This is a great deal with a great incentive.”

Selected proposals will receive a state grant of 50 percent, if at least one of the towns is a “distressed municipality/targeted investment community/public investment community.”

Windham falls under the “distressed municipality” description and Elsesser said he is looking forward to working with Windham.

Municipalities must provide matching funds and the state grant cannot exceed $250,000.

Coventry Director of Public Works David Gofstein said if scheduling the use of equipment is done right, there shouldn’t be any problems with availability among the towns.

“All of the towns would split the cost accordingly,” said Elsesser. He added that each town was asked to put a “placeholder” of $14,000 in their capital budgets.

“For $14,000, we can all get $250,000 of equipment,” he said.

Elsesser added this isn’t a new idea for Coventry; the town has shared a catch basin cleaner with Mansfield for almost 15 years.

Windham Mayor Ernie Eldridge, who wasn’t at Tuesday’s meeting, said he is all for sharing equipment with other towns. “Sharing is a great part of keeping cost down for our towns… Why would one town need $100,000 worth of equipment on their own?” he said.

Paquette said there will be more discussions about the idea.

“There is a strong incentive to get this significant savings,” he said, but they “still need to do some research on the whole idea.”

A decision should be made within the next couple of months. Final proposals must be received by the state Office of Policy and Management on or before May 1, 2012.

Posted Feb. 2, 2012 as edited by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

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Congressman Courtney introduces bill to curb student loan costs

January 25, 2012 Areawide, Business No Comments

The College Cost Reduction and Access Act lowered subsidized Stafford student loan rates from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent over a four-year period, to ease the burden on thousands of students and their families. However, without Congressional action, this act expires; loan rates will double later this year and cost students and families thousands of dollars, over time.

Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney today (Jan. 25) introduced H.R. 3826, legislation that would ensure that interest rates on certain student loans do not dramatically increase this year.

In 2007, Congress made an historic investment in higher education when it passed the College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

The legislation includes a provision that reduced the fixed rate on Stafford student loans for undergraduate students.

The College Cost Reduction and Access Act lowered subsidized Stafford student loan rates from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent over a four-year period, to ease the burden on thousands of students and their families.

However, without Congressional action, this act expires; loan rates will double later this year and cost students and families thousands of dollars, over time.

Courtney’s bill would eliminate the existing “sunset” and ensure that rates remain at 3.4 percent.

“A college education is key to success in today’s economy, but for many students, the spiraling costs of higher education are creating an immense barrier,” said Congressman Courtney.

U.S. Rep Joe Courtney, Connecticut 2nd Congressional District. File photo by Frank Funk

U.S. Rep Joe Courtney, Connecticut 2nd Congressional District. File photo by Frank Funk

“President Obama’s message was spot on last night when he said: ‘When kids do graduate (from high school), the most daunting challenge can be the cost of college. At a time when Americans owe more in tuition debt than credit card debt, this Congress needs to stop the interest rates on student loans from doubling in July.’

“This legislation will defuse that ticking time bomb, and help young people repay the student loans that have weighed them down too heavily for too long,” Courtney said.

According to the non-partisan U.S. PIRG (Public Interest Research Group), if Congress does nothing, borrowers who will take out the maximum $23,000 in subsidized student loans will see their interest balloon to an additional $5,200 over a 10-year repayment period and $11,300 over a 20-year repayment period.

Posted Jan. 25, 2012, as edited by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

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Generations Family Health Center celebrates new home

State Rep Susan Johnson cuts the ribbon at the ceremonial opening Jan. 19, 2012 of Generations Family Health Center in Willimantic CT with Arvind Shaw, CEO of Generations, left and Sen. Donald E. Williams, Jr., right. Photo by Al Malpa

What began more than two decades ago as a part-time health services office in a small “white house” off Mansfield Avenue in Willimantic, has bloomed into a 32,000- square-foot geo­thermal facility.

And, it will allow Generations Family Health Center to improve both the quality and the quantity of the services it provides to local residents.

The new space will allow the health center to increase the number of unduplicated patients from 7,800 to 9,300.

Plus, it’s all theirs.

Administrators, staff, board members, legislators, community members and those otherwise invested in the healthcare facility, which serves under-insured and uninsured residents throughout Windham County, gathered at the new location at 40 Mansfield Ave. (between Main and Valley Streets) Thursday (Jan. 19) for a grand opening ceremony.

Generations actually began servicing patients at the new location Dec. 19, 2010.

For Generations Executive Director Arvind Shaw, the ribbon-cutting was a special day indeed.

“This is way too emotional for me,” said Shaw, reflecting on the journey during a tour of the facility before the ceremony.

Featuring dual access X-ray machines, centralized treatment areas and lots and lots of windows to let in natural light, the new facility rendered the previous rented location at 1315 Main St. cave-like in comparison.

In designing the new facility, Shaw said, they relied on feedback from the people who would be using it the most. “We listened to our staff and we listened to our patients,” said Shaw. “The patients wanted light.”

The $16 million facility was funded by a variety of sources, including a USDA loan, state dollars under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, New Market Tax Credits, as well as donations from foundations, corporations and individuals.

While the building was closed during Thursday’s event, most staff was on hand to share in the big day.

Dr. Margaret Ann Smith, chief dental officer, said her expanded workspace was much needed.

“It doubles the number of people we can take,” said Smith. “It’s beautiful, it’s efficient and the patients just love it.”

In addition to increasing the number of operatories from five to 10, the spacious new dental stations are designed to accommodate left-handed dentists and offer X-ray machines efficiently positioned between two adjacent stations for use by each.

Ken Maharan, a medical assistant who joined Generations a year ago, said the new space is much more professional than the old one. “When you get up in the morning and you like coming to work, it’s a lot of fun,” said Maharan.

Rebecca Antonucci, a medical receptionist, who has never worked in a public healthcare facility before, said the comparison is incredible.

“We do about everything we can to help anyone who needs it,” said Antonucci.

Along with this facility, Generations is also building a new 10,000- square-foot facility in Putnam and has offices in Danielson and Norwich. They also have three mobile stations.

In addition to medical and dental services, the facility also has a comprehensive behavioral health unit serving children and adults with individual and group therapy and medication management.

Dr. Irma Ross, chief of behavioral health, who just joined Generations after 32 years at Waterbury Hospital, said it was an opportunity she couldn’t resist.

U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney helps welcome visitors at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for Generationsl Family Health Center on Jan. 19, 2012 in Willimantic, CT. Seated beside the podium is Generations CEO Arvin Shaw. Photo by Al Malpa

Ross said the focus now is on providing comprehensive health care, which means addressing the whole individual and all of the health-related needs, physical and emotional.

“We are working on integrating medical and behavioral health,” said Ross, including an initiative to get young children in to see the dentist.

Some said the beautiful new facility, which gives no impression of a stereotypical “clinic” atmosphere, is exactly what they wanted.

“We are valuing the human being, having nothing to do with where they come from,” said Ross.

Carl Asikainen, who has been on the Generations Board of Directors for eight years, remembers when owning their own facility, where all the services could be consolidated into a one-stop shop for the patients and the staff, was still just a dream.

Even when the money started materializing, Asikainen said it was hard to imagine it would, one day, amount to what it has. “The people that we treat and the people that we serve deserve this as much as anyone else,” Asikainen said.

Legislators participating in Thursday’s groundbreaking included state Senate President Pro Tempore Donald E. Williams Jr., D- Brooklyn, state Rep. Susan Johnson, D- Willimantic, and U.S. Rep. Joseph Courtney, D-2nd District, while a slew of others joined the festivities, including state Sen. Edith Prague, D-Columbia, making one of her first public appearances since suffering a mild stroke Christmas Day.

After opening at the “white house” on Mansfield Avenue, Generations opened a satellite office at the Windham Heights apartment complex, because that is where many of their patients lived.

Later, it moved to 1315 Main St., where it provided services until now.

“It’s miraculous,” said Dr. Morton Glasser, chief medical officer, who was there at the humble beginning and served patients on a part-time basis at the “white house” – then called the Windham Area Community Action Program (WACAP).

“This whole thing got started because the clientele we were serving were really underserved. Our mission is to serve people who can’t get care otherwise,” Glasser said.

“It’s really heartening to see that we’ve come this far,” he added. “It’s something our patients have deserved all along.”

Generations provides primary health, oral, and behavioral health care, case management and support services for people of all ages. It accepts Medicaid, Medicare, General Assistance, HUSKY, many managed-care programs and most insurance plans. It also offers a sliding fee scale and flexible payment arrangements for those who are eligible. It never turns anyone away for inability to pay.

To learn more, visit www.genhealth.org or call (860) 450-7471.

Posted Jan. 20, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. To keep up-to-date on local news, “like” us (HTNP News) on Facebook and follow us ( @HTNP) on Twitter!

Reinvent Connecticut – still time to register for business workshops

January 4, 2012 Areawide, Business No Comments
"These sessions provide an opportunity for citizens to sit down at a table with a professional, ask questions and have them answered immediately, and fill out applications on the spot.  Small businesses are critical to the state’s economic recovery, and these types of personal gatherings are giving a face to a state agency that is critical to the growth of small businesses.” - Gov. Malloy

"These sessions provide an opportunity for citizens to sit down at a table with a professional, ask questions and have them answered immediately, and fill out applications on the spot. Small businesses are critical to the state’s economic recovery, and these types of personal gatherings are giving a face to a state agency that is critical to the growth of small businesses.” - Gov. Malloy

There is still time to register for the last three workshops in the Reinvent Connecticut series, sponsored by the state Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD).

The workshops are designed to give small businesses a firsthand look at how the state can help them create jobs and expand their operations.

Participants will learn about the recent jobs legislation, as well as existing programs to assist Connecticut businesses.

Key provisions of the recently passed Jobs Bill include:

Small Business Express Program (EXP) – provides $100 million to help Connecticut’s small businesses access much-needed capital.

Job Expansion Tax Credit (JET) program – provides a tax credit $500 per month for each new employee or $900 per month for certain employees if they are disabled, unemployed or a veteran.

First Five program – was expanded so DECD can provide state assistance to five additional business development projects, for a total of 10, in 2012.

The Connecticut Airport Authority (CAA) – can establish additional airport development zones, similar to the zone near Bradley International Airport, around the state’s smaller airports. Businesses within these zones can be eligible for property tax exemptions and corporation business tax credits.

Manufacturing Reinvestment Account (MRA) program – was expanded to help even more small manufacturers in Connecticut invest more in their businesses.

Subsidized Training & Employment Program (STEP) – will provide funding to small businesses and small manufacturers for a portion of a worker’s employment costs, including training.

Increases by a total of up to $340 million in bonding for the state’s Manufacturing Assistance Act (MAA).

Business entity tax – now collected every other year, rather than annually. This lowers the cost of doing business in Connecticut.

DECD has scheduled two webinars for those that cannot attend the final workshops. They will be held Jan. 18, 2012 from 9-10 a.m. and Jan. 19, 2012 from 1-2 p.m. (call 1-800-392-2122 for more information.)

DECD business specialists will be at Housatonic Community College in Bridgeport on Jan. 5; the Four Points Sheraton in Meriden on Jan. 9; the Matrix Corporate Center in Danbury on Jan. 12; and the Branford Community House on Jan. 19.

Those interested in attending the remaining sessions should register in advance at http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/WEB22DQSU2K9BX or call 800-392-2122 for more information.

“Since I took office, one of my primary goals has been to reconnect state government and the business community. One of the concerns I heard most was the feeling that government wasn’t listening – that it was disengaged from those it was supposed to be serving,” said Gov. Malloy. “That’s why these informational sessions are so important. It’s a way for business owners and other entrepreneurial-minded people to get the assistance they need and forge relationships with our business development team.

“These sessions provide an opportunity for citizens to sit down at a table with a professional, ask questions and have them answered immediately, and fill out applications on the spot. Small businesses are critical to the state’s economic recovery, and these types of personal gatherings are giving a face to a state agency that is critical to the growth of small businesses.”

Initiated Nov. 9, 2011 these sessions have been attended by about 800 people and have resulted in more than 144 applications for the state’s newest program called the Small Business Express Program (EXP).

Catherine Smith, commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development and Deputy Commissioner Ron Angelo have led more than 12 sessions across the state.

Posted Jan. 5, 2012

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Want to know more about beekeeping? Learn from the experts

The Eastern CT Beekeeping Association classes, held at UConn, will be a lecture and interactive series, focusing on honeybees and beekeeping, with emphasis on management for pollination and honey production.  Photo source: cals.vt.edu

The Eastern CT Beekeeping Association classes, held at UConn, will be a lecture and interactive series, focusing on honeybees and beekeeping, with emphasis on management for pollination and honey production. Photo source: cals.vt.edu

The Eastern Connecticut Beekeeping Association will lead an introductory beekeeping course for anyone with an interest in bees/beekeeping beginning Jan. 26, 2012 at the University of Connecticut Storrs campus. People who already have colonies are also invited to attend.

Classes will be held in the W.B. Young Building on Thursdays from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., with registration held at 6 p.m. at the first class.

Class dates are Jan. 26, and Feb. 2, 9, 16 – and Feb. 23 is reserved as a snow date, in the event a class is cancelled. (If UConn is closed due to weather, class will not be held.)

The class will be a lecture and interactive series, focusing on honeybees and beekeeping, with emphasis on management for pollination and honey production.

The classes will be conducted by experienced beekeepers Adam Fuller from Hampton CT, Alex Nishball from Mansfield CT and Tim Grilley from Salem CT.

There is a $75 registration fee. The fee includes the class book, “The Backyard Beekeeper,” the class and a one-year membership in the Eastern Connecticut Beekeepers Association.

To register, click on this link (form is in PDF format) http://webpages.charter.net/nectar/ECBA/Bee_School_Reg_2012.pdf, complete the registration form and return it ASAP with a $75 check to: ECBA, P.O. Box 487, Tolland, CT 06084.

If you register by mail, the deadline is Jan. 15, 2012. You may also register in person at the first class if space is still available.

Posted Jan. 3, 2012

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DMV office hours change during Christmas holiday

December 22, 2011 Areawide, Business, Local News No Comments

ct-dmv-bannerDepartment of Motor Vehicles customer service centers will close for the Christmas holiday on Friday, Dec. 23, 2011 at 12:30 p.m. and reopen Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011 at 7:45 a.m.

Major DMV service offices will be open on Thursday until 5:30 p.m.

AAA offices will be open to process driver’s license renewals during their normal business hours on Friday and Saturday.

All AAA offices will be closed on Monday, Dec. 26.

DMV photo licensing centers and satellite offices will have the following adjusted hours around the Christmas holiday:

  • Derby – Railroad Station, 12 Main Street, Friday, Dec. 23 from 8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.;
  • Putnam, 165 Kennedy Drive, Friday, Dec. 23 from 7:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and closed on Saturday, Dec. 24;
  • Middletown- Main Street Market, Friday, Dec. 23 from 8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.;
  • Winsted, 151 Torrington Road, Friday, Dec. 23 from 7:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and closed on Saturday, Dec. 24.

More information about DMV services is available online at ct.gov/dmv or through the DMV telephone center at 860-263-5700 in the Greater Hartford area and 800-842-8222 for the remainder of the state.

Through the web site and phone center, customers can find specific information 24 hours a day on non-driver identification, change of address and change of name as well as

  • vehicle tax questions,
  • records information,
  • forms,
  • emissions testing and inspections,
  • operator’s licenses,
  • titles and registrations
  • and directions to DMV branch offices and photo license centers.

The site also has details on boating registrations, handicapped driver training, commercial vehicle safety, and instructions on how to file a complaint against a dealer or repairer.

Posted Dec. 22, 2011

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Regional Farmers Market trying to establish a new home

December 14, 2011 Areawide, Business, Local News No Comments
Many residents and farmers spoke in favor of the special permit for the new location for the Coventry Regional Farmer's Market at the Dec. 12, 2011 public hearing, while others asked the PZC to take a careful look at the proposal and cited concerns about road maintenance, traffic, gravel dust and noise.  Photo by Sarah L. Hamby

Many residents and farmers spoke in favor of the special permit for the new location for the Coventry Regional Farmer's Market at the Dec. 12, 2011 public hearing, while others asked the PZC to take a careful look at the proposal and cited concerns about road maintenance, traffic, gravel dust and noise. Photo by Sarah L. Hamby

The Coventry Farmers Market will live to fight another day, but its future is still uncertain.

A crowded planning and zoning commission public hearing Monday night at Coventry High School did not conclude with a decision.

Market organizers need a special permit in order to relocate to a site on Silver Street.

At the close of Monday’s hearing, the PZC decided to keep the hearing open tentatively until a January 2012 meeting.

For the last few years, the market has been located at the Nathan Hale Homestead but after not being able to negotiate a workable deal with the agency that governs the property, Connecticut Landmarks, the market’s organizers began looking for a new site.

The special permit would allow the Bridges Healthy Cooking School/Coventry Regional Farmers Market to operate from a privately owned site at 307 Silver St. in Coventry.

According to Jonathon DeHoyos, parking facilities manager with the farmers market, the new site will allow for more than 500 parking spaces, more than two additional acres of market space, and significantly more event space, as well. Street parking would not be necessary or authorized.

Coventry Farmers Market director Winter Caplanson pointed out that for some local farmers,  the market represents 80 percent of their income. Photo by Sarah L. Hamby

Coventry Farmers Market director Winter Caplanson pointed out that for some local farmers, the market represents 80 percent of their income. Photo by Sarah L. Hamby

Market organizers tried at Monday’s meeting to convince the PZC that establishing the market at the new site should not require a traffic study, which could cost upwards of $20,000.

Former Hebron Harvest Fair manager Peter Cafazzo, who was attending the hearing on behalf of the market, addressed the possible traffic concerns on Silver Street and Route 44. “With my background,” he said, “I don’t see any major problems.”

The Hebron Harvest Fair draws several thousand motorists from all over New England each September, with traffic on Route 85 in Hebron packed with fair visitors.

Engineer Peter Henry of Holmes & Henry Associates also described the design for the drive that would be created to access the market site. He said the approximately 600- foot driveway will begin as a paved access road and then transition to gravel after about 100 feet.

At 24 feet wide, it will meet the requirements of local emergency, medical and fire personnel who may need to access the site, Henry said.

Many residents and farmers spoke in favor of the special permit’s approval last night, while others asked the PZC to take a careful look at the proposal and cited concerns about road maintenance, traffic, gravel dust and noise.

Bill Glenney, a Silver Street resident, addressed the commission to oppose the project. He said traffic issues associated with motorists leaving the market had not been addressed.

He also wondered who would foot the bill for the maintenance and repair of Silver Street, a road that he said would see an additional 4,000 to 5,000 cars each month during the market season.

“We are not against farmers or farming,” he said, “(but) I strongly recommend that you disapprove this special permit.”

Supporters expressed a need to maintain the small business economy provided by the local farming community.

Market executive director Winter Caplanson pointed out that the Coventry Regional Farmers market represents 20 to 80 percent of some farmers’ entire farm sales.

This was confirmed by Scotland’s Erica Andrews of Hurricane Farm, who said at least 80 percent of her income is earned in Coventry.

Coventry Town Planner Eric Trott said the PZC simply needs more time to make an informed decision regarding the special permit after receiving significant public input, both in favor and opposed.

Trott said “the applicant did a good job in providing a litany of detail that helped to clarify the issues between the Hale Homestead and the new market.”

In a Facebook posting on Tuesday, Caplanson said that the town will not require a traffic study.

Trott said whether the state will require a traffic study is up to the State Traffic Commission.”We don’t have any bearing on that,” he said.

Trott confirmed this morning that the public hearing will reconvene in January, but said the Jan. 4 date and meeting place are tentative. To confirm the date and time, visit the town’s web site at www.coventryct.org or call the PZC office at (860) 742-4062 during office hours.

Posted Dec. 14, 2011 as edited and added to by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

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Connecticut Water refutes criticisms of UConn water plan

Connecticut Water Eric Thornburg from Town Talk

Connecticut Water is well positioned to provide the water necessary to meet the needs identified for the University and the community over the 50 year planning horizon. The EIE considered the projected demands for the University’s Tech Park and the Next Generation initiative, as well as the Town of Mansfield’s plans for redevelopment of the Four Corners, the proposed managed care facility, and other potential development in the community consistent with their local plans.

Future of local water supply is topic of public forum July 29

water - drinking water - water faucet

Questions about water sources, usage and quality have come into focus recently in light of the Storrs Center development, UConn’s plans to bring in water to support a new Tech Park and the concurrent needs of the towns in this region, particularly in terms of their own development plans.

Coventry Farmers Market invites you to a ‘wellness’ swap

SWAPPERS logo Coventry Farmers Market 2013

As always, anything handmade, handcrafted or homegrown is swappable. But remember – you must sign up and bring something to get something in return!

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