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Officials set to move earth for Storrs Center

Within the last 2 weeks or so the Uconn Publications building (shaped like a quonset hut) was torn down. It was the first building to be taken down as the start of Storrs Center Construction begins its first phase. Fencing around dog lane has blocked may buildings and parking lots in the area. Photo: Roxanne Pandolfi

Within the last 2 weeks or so the UConn Publications building (shaped like a quonset hut) was torn down. It was the first building to be taken down as the start of Storrs Center Construction begins its first phase. Photo: Roxanne Pandolfi

After years of planning and proposals, Storrs Center project officials will break ground for construction Wednes­day (June 29).

Project developers will be joined by local and state officials for the ceremony at 5 p.m. at the inter­section of Route 195 and Dog Lane, with parking available at E.O. Smith High School across the street.

“The groundbreaking for Storrs Center is a tremendous achieve­ment, especially in the current eco­nomic climate, for the Mansfield Downtown Partnership, the town of Mansfield and the University of Connecticut,” said Leyland Alliance LLC managing member Howard Kaufman.

Leyland Alliance is the master developer for the $220 million mixed- use development, which will include both retail and resi­dential spaces. The groundbreaking will be the ceremonial beginning of construc­tion for phases 1A and 1B, which will include roughly 290 rental apartments and 69,000 square feet of retail space.

Leyland Alliance has hired Edu­cation Realty Trust, or EDR, to manage the residential space.

Gov. Dannel Malloy, U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney, D-2nd District, Secretary of the State Denise Merrill and State Rep. Gregory Haddad, D-Mansfield, are all scheduled to attend the ceremony. Mansfield Mayor Elizabeth “Bet­sy” Paterson, UConn President Susan Herbst, UConn President emeritus Philip Austin and Mans­field Downtown Partnership board of directors President Philip Lodewick are also expected to attend.

The town began looking to boost development in the area al­ong Route 195 a decade ago and formed the Mansfield Downtown Partnership Inc. in 2001 to over­see and coordinate the project.

“Nearly 10 years in the plan­ning, our vision for an economi­cally vibrant and vital commu­nity downtown is now becoming a reality,” Lodewick said. “The noise of bulldozers is music to our ears, and we look forward to a formal grand-opening of the first phase of a Storrs Center in the fall of 2012.”

Select Physical Therapy, Vanilla Bean Café, Moe’s Southwest Grill, Storrs Automotive, Wings Over Storrs, Travelplanners, Campus Cuts, Body Language, Tailoring by Tima, Cosimo’s Italian Restaurant and Insomnia Cookies have all submitted letters of intent to be located in the new center.

The first round of construc­tion will also include work to Route 195 and Dog Lane and the construction of a parking garage, Village Street and other aspects.

The Downtown Partnership has created a new web site – www.storrscenterconstruction.blogspot.com – to provide updates on road closures and other public adviso­ries associated with construction.

Dog Lane will closed Wednesday at 4:30 for the ceremony and will reopen once the ceremony is com­plete.

Anyone looking to attend is asked to first respond to the Mansfield Downtown Partnership Inc. at (860) 429-2740 or by e­mail at mdp@mansfieldct.org.

Posted 6-29-2011

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Mansfield's Borders Express on possible closure list

The Borders Express store in the East Brook Mall has been added to a list of 51 other locations nationwide that may close as Borders fights to avoid bankruptcy.

Borders has already closed about a third of its stores in an effort to become solvent.

A store in Trumbull has also been put on the chopping block in addi­tion to the store in the East Brook Mall.

This news comes shortly after the company already closed its stores in Danbury, Manchester, Milford, Simsbury, Southbury and Wilton, with stores in Fairfield and Stamford scheduled to close.

The company still has stores open in Farmington, Waterford and Meriden.

The Ann Arbor, Mich., retailer filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy pro­tection in mid-February.

Mary Davis, the chain’s spokesman, stressed, however, that the com­pany is also renegotiating the lease terms for all 51 stores listed for possible closure, so not all stores on the list will close.

Posted 6-16-2011

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Union leaders reach tentative agreement with Gov. Malloy

May 13, 2011 Areawide, Business No Comments

Gov Dannel Malloy

The State Employee Bargaining Agent Coalition (SEBAC) announced this afternoon (May 13) that “after several months of discussions and many long nights,” union leaders and Gov. Malloy have reached a tentative agreement on a cost-savings package to help close the state’s budget deficit.

The administration has also agreed to rescind layoff notices for nearly 5,000 state workers that were announced earlier this week, the SEBAC press release states.

According to Patrice Peterson, President, CSEA SEIU Local 2001, “The agreement is intended to help reduce costs while protecting public services in the current and next fiscal years, and to help put Connecticut on a firmer footing for economic recovery.”

When finalized, the agreement is expected to result in approximately $1.6 billion in combined labor cost reductions and service efficiencies, she states.

“The agreement also provides job security, and does not contain any furlough days or reductions in work hours for permanent state employees… State employees used their knowledge and experience to create a better future for themselves, their services and the people of Connecticut they proudly serve,” she states.

The SEBAC did not release specifics of the agreement.

According to Peterson, “in order to respect the fundamental rights of the working men and women we represent, SEBAC leaders have agreed not to publicize details until they can be presented to members of our unions. This process will begin immediately.”

SEBAC represents about 45,000 members.

“Given the extraordinary stakes involved, we sought to avoid the speculation and misunderstandings that would hamper our ultimate goal of reaching a mutual settlement by keeping our discussions out of the media,” the release states. “The reality is that more work remains to be done. Any final agreements must be ratified by the members of our unions and approved by state lawmakers.”

Gov. Malloy’s remarks

Gov. Malloy also made an announcement on the tentative agreement to the media this afternoon.

“I am pleased to announce that we have reached an agreement with our fellow state employee leaders that will, over the next 20 years, save Connecticut taxpayers a total of $21.5 billion,” he said.

“This is the most significant agreement with state employees in Connecticut history, not just because it solves a short-term problem – but because it produces the kind of long-term, structural reform WE – Connecticut’s residents, elected leaders and our state’s workforce – so desperately need if we are to again grow, produce new jobs, and prosper together,” Gov. Malloy said.

“Our agreement is also historic because of the way we achieved it. We respected the collective bargaining process and we respected each other, negotiating in good faith, without fireworks and without anger. To my friends in SEBAC, thank you. You have stepped up to the plate and said you want to be part of the solution. Under this agreement, we will all share in the sacrifices necessary to stabilize the state’s finances,” Gov. Malloy said.

“In the short-term, over the next two years, this agreement will save taxpayers 1.6 billion dollars. The remaining $400 million we need to balance this budget will come from a mix of additional spending cuts and existing budgeted revenues,” he said.

He added, “Taxes will not rise beyond what is already in this budget.”

“These savings were achieved in the areas of healthcare and pension benefits, and wages. Our fellow state employee leaders have asked us to refrain from discussing the specific details within each of those categories until they’ve had a chance to communicate them to their members. We’re happy to comply with that request,” Malloy said.

Malloy also noted that there are no furlough days (unpaid days off) in this agreement or a reduction in the 40-hour work week.

“This means we’ve achieved these savings without reducing government’s ability to serve its constituents, and without reducing employees’ productivity,” Gov. Malloy said.

He also thanked Democratic leadership “for the strength and leadership they have demonstrated” as well as Mark Ojakian and Linda Yelmini who negotiated on behalf of the governor’s office and Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman.

“As many of you know, Nancy has a long-standing relationship with our state employee unions and their members, and her guidance and wisdom throughout this process has been invaluable,” Gov. Malloy said.

He concluded by saying, “I want to be very clear that, as I said the day I signed the budget that was passed by the Legislature, this is not a day to celebrate. Yes, it’s a significant accomplishment, and yes, it will save taxpayers an enormous amount of money over time – but any time you ask sacrifices of people, you need to be mindful of the impact on their lives. And I am.”

He added that he will continue to downsize state government.

“Over the next few years, I intend to reduce the number of state employees, but rather than doing that by layoffs, we will do it by attrition, and by eliminating managerial positions,” he said.

Gov. Malloy also said he has directed OPM to immediately suspend layoff notices and rescind those that were handed out earlier this week, “as a show of good faith.”

He added, “I urge my fellow state employees to approve this agreement in a timely fashion. Once ratified by the rank-and-file workers, we stand ready to work with the leadership of the General Assembly to secure final approval. When that happens, come July 1, the state will have in place a budget that is balanced with no gimmicks, and one that provides something the state hasn’t had in many years: fiscal stability.”

Posted May 13, 2011

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Legislation would allow developers to use state-protected land

May 12, 2011 Areawide, Business 1 Comment
“East Haddam has been very actively looking for open space and my feeling is people considering making a deal with us will now ask themselves, ‘How long is it going to take for you to sell it to someone else?’” - East Haddam Selectman Emmett Lyman  Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Free Use

“East Haddam has been very actively looking for open space and my feeling is people considering making a deal with us will now ask themselves, ‘How long is it going to take for you to sell it to someone else?’” - East Haddam Selectman Emmett Lyman Photo source: Wikimedia Commons Free Use

Editor’s note: While this controversy has focused on the two towns most immediately affected by the proposed legislation (Haddam and East Haddam), I believe this issue is of interest to anyone in the state who is involved with conservation and preservation of open space, farmlands, nature preserves, etc. since SB 1196 will apply not just to this particular 17-acre parcel but to any state-protected property. That is why I am posting this story on all of our news sites. The bill is currently going before the House and Senate. If you have concerns, or if you would like to support this bill, now would be the time to contact your local representatives. This story also contains links to the two Web sites for the opponents and the developers and their supporters. Letters to the Editor on this subject can be emailed to editor@htnp.com (Posted May 12, 2011)

While he initially felt some economic benefit could come of a controversial proposal to use state-protected property in Haddam for development, East Haddam First Selectman Mark Walter has now joined fellow selectmen in sending a letter to the state to oppose the plan.

Walter said in an interview today that he originally favored the idea as “trying to support a regional focus on tourism.”

The state-protected land is in the Tylerville section of Haddam near the Connecticut River. Private developers Riverhouse Properties want to develop the land for a hotel or inn, shops, entertainment and other amenities.

They have proposed a land swap that would give Haddam 87 acres of woods in the Higganum section of town, adjacent to Cockaponset State Forest.

Just before the East Haddam Board of Selectmen’s meeting last week, that evening Walter had said, “At this point, I am starting to get the facts and understand how all this works… there’s a lot of misinformation out there… the main reason I am supportive of the Haddam selectman [First Selectman DeStefano, who favors the swap] is because we want to promote economic development in that corridor.”

“How it gets done is where it gets complicated, because it could set a precedence… it is of interest to both towns – to the whole state, really – because it’s being done through legislation,” he said.

Today, Walter said discussion at the selectmen’s meeting persuaded him that the legislation could have long-term negative impact on negotiations with property owners considering donating or selling their land for conservation purposes.

“As we have looked more and more into this, I have become uncomfortable with this use of state land,” Walter said.

The proposal has had strong support from State Sen. Eileen Daily – as it has in past years when it was unsuccessfully proposed – but it has ignited a firestorm of protest from many of her constituents.

Despite those protests, the bill is making progress. As of today, Senate Bill 1196 has already received unanimous approval from the Legislature’s Finance Committee and so, is set to go before the House and Senate.

Not compelling enough

In an interview last week, East Haddam Selectman Peter Govert said he introduced the motion to write the letter opposing Senate Bill 1196.

“First and foremost, I believe it will have a chilling effect on land conservation and preservation when it comes to donors,” he said.

He noted that at a Democratic Town Committee meeting attended by Sen. Daily, he heard an East Haddam resident who had recently sold a sizeable piece of land for conservation say that if this land swap had occurred before the sale, she would have decided to sell the land to a developer “and get more money.”

Govert also recalled that this “land conveyance bill” was vetoed by former Gov. M. Jodi Rell twice in the past. “This would be the third time they are trying to get it passed,” he said.

As for sending a letter to the Legislature, Govert said, “We thought we’d send a very clear message that we don’t support it.”

He added that the decision was not entered into lightly.

“We didn’t rush into this position… We talked about this at previous (Board of Selectmen) meetings. We discussed the pro’s and con’s. We saw the Powerpoint presentation by Riverhouse Development (March 10). We’ve looked at the (Stop the Swap) Web site,” Govert said.

Whether or not the plans he’s seen are realistic is another one of his concerns, Govert said: “We aren’t convinced by the state or by the developers that they have a viable plan. There are a lot of unanswered questions. Who pays for sewage? What about drinking water? Where’s the traffic plan?”

Govert also has some concerns about a part of the bill that includes 2.7 acres owned by Goodspeed. “It’s near the parking lot that the town (East Haddam) owns, by the river,” he said. The Town of East Haddam has an easement on that property for use of the boat launch.

He added that while Sen. Daily has said this property has been removed from the bill, “the last time I looked on the (legislative) Web site, it was still there.”

Opening a door

Walter also expressed concern that if this legislation passes, it could encourage other proposals that could be more difficult to stop.

For example, he recalled a proposal by the Audubon Society to sell a piece of land known as the Harlow Haagenson Preserve off of Creek Road.

The proposal led to the formation of a Friends of Haagenson to stop the sale, and former State Atty. Gen. Richard Blumenthal also stepped in, Walter said.

“Now, there are rumblings that the Audubon may try again to sell it,” Walter said.

He also pointed to the town’s acquisition of 280 acres known as the Shagrue property that ended up being resolved in court as an example of how complicated land negotiations can be.

Two sisters shared ownership – one owned five-sixths of the land and another one-sixth – and the court had to settle which part of the farm would constitute the one-sixth that was retained by one sister, Walter said. “This was because the (preserved) land had to stay in active farm use.”

“So, it’s never easy… and this bill could set a precedence that would make it even more difficult,” Walter said.

A viable plan?

East Haddam Selectman Emmett Lyman also expressed serious concern about the legislation opening the door to similar deals and the effect that could have on future negotiations.

Lyman noted he served on the town’s Planning and Zoning Commission and the Open Space Commission, “and I am very aware of how difficult it is to convince people to turn land over to the town or state.”

“One thing you’re always up against is a developer standing there with a checkbook in his back pocket,” Lyman said.

What gives the town, state agency or conservation group some kind of edge is a “special trust” that the property – and perhaps family memories connected to that land – will be protected from development, he said.

If this land conveyance bill is approved, “what we’re doing is violating that trust,” he said.

“East Haddam has been very actively looking for open space and my feeling is people considering making a deal with us will now ask themselves, ‘How long is it going to take for you to sell it to someone else?’”

He noted that in one instance, it took the town 10 years to negotiate with owners of a farm property. “That isn’t uncommon at all. It’s often a long and very fragile process,” he said.

Lyman said he’s also surprised at how little the State has offered to convince residents this land swap would be a good thing. “I expected the State to come forth with really compelling arguments why this would be good for tourism, for the economy… they didn’t. In the past, they (the proponents) have just slid it past us – and that makes people uncomfortable,” Lyman said.

He added that he, himself, has 40 acres of land near Six Flags in Suffield and if this legislation passes, he would personally feel worried about selling or donating his property for conservation.

He also has simple ethical issues with the proposal, he said. “This is conservation money that comes from you and me and other taxpayers,” Lyman said.

He added, “Do I think economic development is important in the lower Connecticut River Valley? Could we use some help? Yes. But let’s do it in a very public way. And I just don’t think the case has been made… it has to be public and it has to be compelling because you’re betraying a trust.”

Originally posted in East Haddam Today on May 11, 2011; site walk poster added May 12

flyer

Related links:

Web site for proponents of the land swap http://www.haddamlandswap.com/

Sharp debate over land swap proposal, NPR http://www.yourpublicmedia.org/content/wnpr/sharp-debate-over-land-swap-proposal

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Rep. Hurlburt invites you to take an online survey

State Rep. Bryan Hurlburt, who represents Ashford, Tolland and Willington in the Legislature, is presented a Connecticut-grown cauliflower from Working Lands Alliance Chair Terry Jones during a recent ceremony at the State Capitol. Hurlburt was given a "Leaders Award" from the WLA for his work on the new "Farms, Food & Jobs" law that encourages the production and sale of Connecticut-grown food. Courtesy photo

State Rep. Bryan Hurlburt, who represents Ashford, Tolland and Willington in the Legislature, is presented a Connecticut-grown cauliflower from Working Lands Alliance Chair Terry Jones during a recent ceremony at the State Capitol. Hurlburt was given a "Leaders Award" from the WLA for his work on the new "Farms, Food & Jobs" law that encourages the production and sale of Connecticut-grown food. Courtesy photo

State Rep. Bryan Hurlburt – who represents Willington, Ashford and Tolland in the General Assembly – recently created an online survey on his legislative Web page at http://www.housedems.ct.gov/Hurlburt/Survey_2011.asp and is encouraging constituents to offer their opinions on issues being worked on during the 2011 legislative session.

Survey questions mostly focus on the current state budget crisis. Participants are given choices as to what state spending they recommend being cut or protected and what taxes they think should be raised to help cover an estimated $3.5 billion budget deficit.

Hurlburt said the response has already been terrific and is pleased by the number of people who have taken the survey, so far.

“Everybody knows the state is facing a budget crisis and it is very helpful to me to know peoples’ thoughts on the best way to solve it,” said Hurlburt, who chairs the Appropriations Subcommittee on Conservation and Development. “There is also a question on what issues people are most concerned about these days such as health care or crime.”

Questions range from cutting or maintaining funding for seniors and veterans’ services to aid to public schools and fixing roads and bridges.

On the revenue side, respondents can consider changes on income and sales taxes and even if they favor allowing the sale of alcohol on Sundays.

Rep. Hurlburt is serving his third term in the State Legislature representing the 53rd Assembly District. He serves on the Appropriations, Environment and Higher Education committees.

Posted May 10, 2011

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Job Fair May 12 for Storrs Center construction

construction-blueprints-hardhatStorrs Center Alliance and Education Realty Trust, together with Erland Construction, will host a local job fair for people from the area interested in potential job opportunities in the construction of the first phase of Storrs Center.

The job fair will be held in the gymnasium at the Mansfield Community Center (10 South Eagleville Road) in Storrs-Mansfield at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 12.

Storrs Center will be a mixed-use town center and main street corridor at the crossroads of the Town of Mansfield and the University of Connecticut.

Storrs Center will combine retail, restaurant and office uses with a variety of residence types including studios, town homes, condominium apartments and rental apartments.

For inquiries about the job fair, contact StorrsCenterInfo@erland.com

(Use Storrs Center as your search term to read previous stories posted in Mansfield Today about the project.)

Posted May 9, 2011

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Learn more about impact of regional water use plans on Willington

The Willimantic River as seen from the Garden on the Bridge next to ArtSpace. Photo copyright 2011 by Brenda Sullivan

The Willimantic River as seen from the Garden on the Bridge next to ArtSpace. Photo copyright 2011 by Brenda Sullivan

Water supply is a global issue, but locally the issues hit closer to home when towns are trying to boost economic development – while at the same time, provide enough clean drinking water and sewage service.

Mansfield is currently trying to find ways to bring businesses back to the Four Corners area (Route 44 and 195), but one of the largest obstacles is water supply.

Willimantic is trying to “grow” its downtown, and at the same time, the Willimantic Whitewater Partnership is working on a major project that would create a whitewater park and tourist destination by tapping into the power of the Willimantic River.

Willimantic already has a small hydropower station operating on the river.

To learn more about regional decisions that will affect water supply in Tolland, Storrs/Mansfield, Coventry, Willington and Willimantic, come to the Water Supply Forum that will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. this Wednesday, May 11.

The forum, hosted by the Willimantic River Alliance, will be held at Storrs Community Church, 90 Tolland Turnpike (Route 195) in Coventry (the new church across the road from Pumpkin Paul’s Farm on Route 195).

According to Meg Reich, Vice President of the Willimantic River Alliance, representatives from the University of Connecticut, the Connecticut Water Company (CWC), the Tolland Water Commission and the Mansfield Four Corners Sewer and Water Committee will make brief presentations from 6:45 to 7:15 p.m. and will be available to answer questions from 6 p.m. until the end of the forum at 9 p.m.

There also will be plans and maps on display for the following:

  • CT Water Company’s proposed regional pipeline
  • UConn’s new five-year water supply plan, including water conservation and wellfield management plans
  • Tolland Water Commission’s water diversion application to increase water drawn from their Willimantic River wellfield
  • Mansfield Four Corners Sewer and Water Committee’s draft plan for a source of water for the RT 195/44 intersection

Drawing more from the Willimantic River

The Tolland Water Commission has applied for a water diversion permit to double its withdrawals from existing wells along the Willimantic River to continue to supply Tolland homes, schools and businesses south of I-84 into the future.

It would also connect with the Connecticut Water Company’s water pipeline, from Shenipsit Lake (which already serves the Tolland Green area north of I-84) for a back-up emergency water source.

The Willimantic River Alliance suggests that the CWC could create a new regional water supply pipeline if it were to connect with the Tolland system south of I-84.

At Four Corners and UConn

A new pipeline from Tolland to Storrs-Mansfield extending along Route 195 could not only provide backup water for Tolland’s water supply needs, it could also meet the needs for water at Four Corners and the University of Connecticut in Storrs, the Alliance suggests.

A new well along the Willimantic River or interconnection with an existing piped water supply are options for Four Corners, according to a draft plan currently under review.

UConn also recently prepared a new five-year water supply plan for the Storrs and Mansfield Depot campuses and areas adjacent to the campus.

The draft March 2011 plan calls for an integrated approach to managing its wellfields along the Fenton and Willimantic Rivers.

It also explores water conservation measures, including a reclaimed water facility to recycle treated wastewater from their sewage treatment plant to use as cooling water for their central utility plant and irrigation water for campus athletic fields.

The Alliance notes that the plan acknowledges that there is a greater demand for even more water during dry summers, so a new additional source of water is needed.

Potential sources include a new well along the Willimantic River or an interconnection with an existing piped water supply… the same options as for the Four Corners area.

All of these projects involve the Willimantic River, its watershed and aquifers.

They will affect not only the towns where they are planned, Tolland and Mansfield, but also adjacent towns, the Alliance notes.

Coventry Village

Coventry Village needs more water, and may also need a new well along the Willimantic River; Mansfield and Coventry officials have met to consider sharing a well.

Tolland’s water was extended to Willington’s Hall Memorial School on Route 32 two summers ago.

CWC’s proposed regional pipeline could result in demand for more intense development along the pipeline’s corridor, affecting land not only in Tolland and Storrs-Mansfield, but in Coventry and Willington, the Alliance suggests.

The pipeline would involve transferring significant amounts of water from the Hockanum River watershed to the Willimantic River watershed.

UConn’s reclaimed water facility would recycle water, but also reduce the amount of water flowing into the Willimantic River.

Towns need to work together

All of these water diversions need to be evaluated to make sure there is a good balance of water for people and for aquatic life, the Alliance notes.

Addressed separately, these water supply decisions could be uncoordinated and could result in unintended consequences, the Alliance states.

The Willimantic River Alliance is advocating for a coordinated regional approach where all of the parties can explore solutions with mutual benefits and minimal adverse consequences.

In an effort to provide the public with more information on these important projects and to foster the communication which a regional approach will require, the WRA is hosting this water supply forum

For more information, visit the Web site at www.willimanticriver.org Or call Meg Reich at 860-455-0532

Posted May 8, 2011

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Get rid of sensitive documents responsibly on Earth Day

April 22, 2011 Areawide, Business No Comments

shredded-paper-with-plant-sprouting-2011A free shredding and paper recycling day will be offered on Earth Day, which falls on Friday, April 22 this year.

The service is being offered by the Easter Seals Capital Region & Eastern Connecticut and its subsidiary company, EnviroShred.

Shredding provides a safe and secure means for disposal of personal, confidential, or sensitive information.

EnviroShred operates as an affirmative business of Easter Seals Capital Region & Eastern Connecticut and directly employs individuals with disabilities in support of fulfilling their goals of self-sufficiency and community integration.

EnviroShred is a regional leader in providing safe, secure and environmentally-friendly document destruction. The company operates in accordance with all state laws and regulations and maintains compliance with Federal Government standards for document disposal.

An important part of this service is preserving our environment. Each ton of paper that EnviroShred shreds and recycles saves 17 trees, 100 gallons of gas, 60 pounds of air pollutants, 7,000 gallons of water and 4,200 kilowatt-hours of electricity.

EnviroShred will also accept office materials, corrugated cardboard, X-Ray film, magazines and newspapers to be shredded and recycled.

The Earth Day shredding and recycling event will be held at EnviroShred’s facility, located at 22 Prestige Park Circle in East Hartford.

From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., you can bring in bags, boxes, or containers of paper to be shredded on-site, so you can feel confident your documents are destroyed.

As an introduction to EnviroShred’s services, local businesses are also invited to bring in up to four (4) boxes of papers to be shredded free.

Questions? Contact Rosemary J. Aielloat (860) 833-9861 or visit the Web site at www.enviroshredct.com.

Posted April 22, 2011

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Connecticut Water refutes criticisms of UConn water plan

Connecticut Water Eric Thornburg from Town Talk

Connecticut Water is well positioned to provide the water necessary to meet the needs identified for the University and the community over the 50 year planning horizon. The EIE considered the projected demands for the University’s Tech Park and the Next Generation initiative, as well as the Town of Mansfield’s plans for redevelopment of the Four Corners, the proposed managed care facility, and other potential development in the community consistent with their local plans.

Future of local water supply is topic of public forum July 29

water - drinking water - water faucet

Questions about water sources, usage and quality have come into focus recently in light of the Storrs Center development, UConn’s plans to bring in water to support a new Tech Park and the concurrent needs of the towns in this region, particularly in terms of their own development plans.

Coventry Farmers Market invites you to a ‘wellness’ swap

SWAPPERS logo Coventry Farmers Market 2013

As always, anything handmade, handcrafted or homegrown is swappable. But remember – you must sign up and bring something to get something in return!

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